Global Trader Europe

16th December 2008

Global Trader Europe Limited went into administration on 15 February 2008 and was subsequently placed into liquidation on 17 June 2008. Stephen Cork and Joanne Milner of Smith & Williamson are liquidators of this firm. 

The role of FSCS

The FSCS is currently talking to the liquidators to determine our involvement in considering claims against Global Trader Europe Limited.

The FSCS may be able to help customers of the firm if it is unable to pay claims made against it (described by us as being "in default") and if claims are eligible for compensation under FSCS rules. The firm has not yet been declared in default by the FSCS.

What to do if you think you have a claim

If you believe that you may have a claim against Global Trader Europe Limited you should contact the liquidators at the address below to register your claim against the firm:

Smith & Williamson
25 Moorgate
London
EC2R 6AY

Tel: 020 7131 4000

There is no need to register your claim with FSCS at this time. If FSCS declares Global Trader Europe Limited in default in the future, FSCS will then contact potential claimants who have registered a claim with the liquidators.

About the FSCS

The Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) is the UK's statutory fund of last resort for customers of financial services firms and may be able to help consumers if an authorised firm is unable to pay claims against it. The Scheme was set up under the terms of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 and protects deposits, insurance, investments and mortgage business.

More information about the FSCS

Jargon Buster

  • Authorised firm

    a company, unincorporated body, partnership or individual permitted to carry out a regulated activity by the FCA or the PRA. This term includes a mutual (unincorporated) organisation, for example a friendly society.
  • Deposits

    money placed in a bank or similar institution to earn interest or for safe-keeping.
  • Eligible

    qualifying for compensation under Scheme rules.
  • In default

    A firm unable, or likely to be unable to pay claims against it. This will generally be because it has stopped trading and has insufficient assets to meet claims, or is in insolvency.